Shortlisted for NOA prize

Painting 'Geothermal unrest' 61 x 76cm oil on canvas has been shortlisted for the prestigious NOA (National open art) Prize. This piece was inspired by my time in Iceland in 2016.

Geothermal unrest

Artist Interview

Cornwall has always provided the bewitching backdrop for Amy Albright’s journey as an artist. The abstract landscape painter grew up near Lostwithiel, studied in Falmouth and had her first solo exhibition in Newlyn. In the first of our new Artists & Makers series, we catch up to talk about her inspirations, experimental style and favourite Cornish views…

How did you become an artist?
It sounds clichéd but it’s what I always wanted to do, from a young age I loved to create. I used to love going on nature walks and coming home with pockets full of shells and seeds. I toyed with graphic design for a while, but it was painting that excited me and I chose to study Fine Art. I had a fantastic tutor at University College Falmouth and went on to win the Midas Award when I graduated, which gave me a head start into the competitive art world. My first solo exhibition was at the Newlyn Art Gallery a year later and it went from there.

Can you sum up your work in a sentence?
Experimental, evocative and ethereal; abstract, landscape oil paintings.

What’s your ideal working environment?
My studio at Krowji (the shared creative space near Redruth) suits me perfectly. I like having other creative people doing their thing near by. I once worked next to a corporate office and it just didn’t feel right! At Krowji I have a big open studio, with lots of floor space, lots of natural light, a good sound system and a café on site for treats.

Tell us a little bit about your inspiration and process
I work on lots of paintings at once, building up layer upon layer of thin oil paint, mixed with glazes and other mediums. I look at lots of different sources, including my own photographs and drawings. I have a rough idea when I start a painting and tend to limit my colour palette but it is an organic process, when the painting starts, original ideas get lost and new ones arise and the paintings evolve over time. The hardest part is knowing when to stop!

Your work obviously draws on the landscape. What are your favourite Cornish views?
Trelissick in Feock is a favourite, I enjoy the meadow walk with views of the river Fal and sweeping green hills all around. I also love the north coast, in particular Harlyn Bay beach and the rugged coastline around Chapel Porth near St Agnes.

What are you working on now?
I am building up a series of paintings loosely inspired by the areas where land and water meet, a theme I have been working with for some time now. I am also about to start work on a large commission for a vineyard owner in southern Italy.

Where can we see your work this year?
I have a feature exhibition at Artwave West, gallery in Dorset in April and another show in Falmouth at Beside the Wave Gallery in March. I’ll also be participating in this year’s Open Studios Cornwall event, from 27 May – 4 June.

Can you teach us please?
Yes of course! I am a tutor at St Ives School of Painting, which I love, there is something very magical about working at the Porthmeor studios. I also run one-day ‘Experimental Painting in Layers’ workshops from my studio at Krowji. It’s suitable for all abilities and is a great way to learn a new, unique approach to oil painting (email Amy for details on: aklalbright@hotmail.com)

Do you have a favourite painting of yours or one that holds strong memories?
One of my favourites is Deep Sea Dance, a large painting I did a few years ago for the largest floating art collection in the world — on board the P&O cruise ship Britannia. It was my first commission, after having my little boy Henry, and was nearly two metres long. I just loved being back in studio and creating something I knew would be floating around the world. I have great memories of making that painting.

And finally, if you could magically transport one piece of artwork in the world to a wall in your home, what would it be? 
This is tricky! But I’d say Snow Storm – Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth, by JMW Turner. This painting has incredible energy, you feel as though you are moving into the storm when you look at it, it is very moving.
Interview with Sophie Baker, from Muddy Stilettos Cornwall

Photography by Ruaidhri Marshall

London Exhibition

Exhibition at 'Beside the wave London' Primrose Hill, runs from 9th -29th September. A mixed exhibition of eight painters currently working at Krowji studios, Cornwall's largest creative hub and home to some of the south-west's leading artists.

Painting in window - Amy Albright, 'Phosphorescence' 90 x 90cm oil on canvas 2016

Painting in window - Amy Albright, 'Phosphorescence' 90 x 90cm oil on canvas 2016

Art workshops from my studio

 I will be running a series of one day workshops from my studio at Krowji in Cornwall.

'Experimental painting in layers' Using acrylics and oils, £65 per day all materials included.

Next workshop dates:
-Wednesday 27th September 2017 10.30-4pm
-Friday 29th September 2017 10.30-4pm (follow on workshop)
Contact me for more information or to book a place.

"It was amazing and we all learnt so much. Above all it was great fun. You organised the whole day really well and certainly made it very well structured and at the same time captivating! We all loved it and are so pleased with our masterpieces!"   Rachel from Lostwithiel.

Above and Below - SOLO EXHIBITION at Artwave west, Dorset

The mysterious paintings by Cornish Artist, Amy Albright have been exhibited by Artwave West, since its opening in 2009. Albright’s fascination with the interconnecting forms and patterns of the natural world has led her over the past ten years to evolve her own distinct visual language. Ambiguity between vastness and microscopic has always been an interest and this has manifested itself in paintings of exquisite enigma. In her latest works produced for this exhibition a subtle connection to the landscape is revealed. Interludes within veils of mist expose hidden pine forests; suggestion of branches and formations begin to materialise. These dendrite (branch like) patterns evolve into further references reminiscent of the grandeur of the universe. The fact that the same pattern can be found on different scales, for example in a tiny single brain neuron or on a larger scale in the path of a meandering river, is most fitting. Albright’s working process has become increasingly fluid and in seeking to utilise spontaneous painting methods, she has opened up an even greater emphasis on suggestions of the unknown.  Gould 2015

In the elements, 120 x 100cm oil on canvas.

In the elements, 120 x 100cm oil on canvas.

For a full catalogue and price list email the gallery  info@artwavewest.com

In the press...

Feature from the WMN - Western Morning news on Sunday.
Click on image to read full article.

P&O Cruise Ship Commission - In the press

Amy is on board with P&O

AMY ALBRIGHT, a University College Falmouth graduate, has been commissioned to produce four large paintings for P&O cruises' latest ship, Britannia.

The striking semi-abstract oil paintings will be positioned in a public area of the ship for all to see. Britannia will boast Britain's largest floating art collection, containing more than 8,000 artworks, when it launches in March next year.

P&O's art consultant Tom Tempest-Radford said: "Most of the artworks are abstract, based on the sea and music and the whole thing together is a symphony."

Amy has exhibited nationally since winning the Midas Award in 2008 and is achieving great success, with other collectors including Tresco Estate, Isles of Scilly. In 2013 she was made a member of the NSA (Newlyn Society of Artists) and has previously been selected as Artist in residence at Tresco Gallery and Beaford Academy. Amy has lived in Cornwall most of her life, growing up in Lostwithiel. She is now based at Krowji Studios, Redruth and is working towards a major solo exhibition at Artwave West gallery in Dorset next year.

When describing her work Amy said: "I paint using an intuitive, organic technique; building up the surface with numerous layers of paint. With an unsettled sense of scale I aim to capture the magical, elusive dancing light found in our oceans shallows and depths."

 West Briton, Cornish Guardian Jan 2014.

Read more: http://www.cornishguardian.co.uk/Amy-board-P-amp-O/story-25852800-detail/story.html#ixzz3Z6qrJpZM 
http://www.westbriton.co.uk/Amy-board-P-amp-O/story-25852800-detail/story.html

Midas Award winner

Midas Award 2007: Winner of Cornwall's contemporary art award announced - Amy Albright

The top prize awarded to Amy Albright by chairman of Midas, Steve Hindley, for her evocative paintings, was a bursary providing funding for studio space at Krowji, a solo show at Newlyn Art Gallery in 2008 and professional development support from Creative Skills.